Council Tree Hollows program

Lorikeet in tree hollow.jpeg

1. Overview

Nest boxes for the regions native fauna have been installed in Mount Evelyn, Lilydale and Montrose as part of Yarra Ranges Council storm recovery works.

Following the June 2021 storm, many native wildlife lost their homes because of tree and canopy loss.

It’s estimated that over 25,000 trees fell within the Yarra Ranges municipality during the 2021 June storm and that some of those trees housed valuable tree hollows.

As tree hollows are an increasingly scarce and a valuable resource, Council is working to support vulnerable species that rely on hollows for nesting and breeding. 

In August, qualified arborists were engaged to install a variety of nest boxes with the installations completed under the guidance of Council staff across six sites in the suburbs of Lilydale, Mount Evelyn and Montrose.  

In the long term, these Nest boxes will be monitored by volunteers and Landcare groups to collect valuable data, which will be used to improve future nest box projects and provide information on particular species.

This video will provide more information on the combination of hollows that Council is using to create more homes for wildlife in the Yarra Ranges municipality. 

 

2. Volunteering 

Council aims to also create opportunities for: TAFE students, local Landcare groups and residents to be involved in annual monitoring while also creating more awareness of the significance of hollows.

it is planned that these nest boxes will be monitored by volunteers and Landcare/friends groups to collect valuable data, which will be used to improve future nest box projects and provide information on particular species.

If you are interested in volunteering in this program, please email: environmentalvolunteers@yarraranges.vic.gov.au or fill out the form below. 

Click here to view form.

3. Frequently Asked Questions

What types of nest boxes are being used?

A combination of hollows will be used to create more homes for wildlife in the Yarra Ranges municipality and each type has certain characteristics that make them applicable for certain species

1. Traditional Nest box: these are traditional type pine boxes which are attached to trees and are useful in providing supplementary habitat, particularly in suburban areas, where older trees are lacking.

2. The Hollow hog: this type of hollow requires arborists to drill a small hole the size of a finger into the tree by using a uniquely designed drill head which does not damage the long term health of the tree. This type of hollow mimics a natural hollow and harnesses the thermal and microbial properties of the tree.

3. Habitech hollow: Habitech nest boxes are 3D printed and completely modular, with a stackable design and multiple entry configurations to suit a range of species great and small, delivering the diversity of nature. These are best suited for birds and gliders. 







Why do we need these nest boxes?

Many of our regions wildlife species rely on tree hollows for roost and nest sites. This includes possums, sugar gliders, parrots, microbats, phascogales and owls.

Natural tree hollows can take upwards of 100 years to form. It’s estimated that over 25,000 trees fell within the Yarra Ranges municipality during the 2021 June storm. Sadly some of those trees housed valuable tree hollows.

DELWP and Council are committed to restoring those hollow bearing trees that were lost from the storm and responsibly recreating essential habitat for some of our key and iconic wildlife.




What species will use these nest boxes?

There are over 30 local native species that rely on hollows for breeding and nesting

In particular, extra focus has been placed on providing hollows suitable for the threatened Gang Gang Cockatoo, sugar gliders and rosellas.



Who will monitor the nest boxes for progress?

In the long term, it is planned that these nest boxes will be monitored by volunteers and Landcare groups to collect valuable data, which will be used to improve future nest box projects and provide information on particular species.

Council aims to also create opportunities for: TAFE students, local Landcare groups and residents to be involved in annual monitoring while also creating more awareness of the significance of hollows


How many locations and nest boxes are there?

96 nest boxes have been installed at six sites around the Mount Evelyn, Montrose and Lilydale areas.

Each sites has 16 hollows installed. 

How can i volunteer to monitor the nest boxes?

In the long term, it is planned that these nest boxes will be monitored by volunteers and Landcare groups to collect valuable data, which will be used to improve future nest box projects and provide information on particular species.

Council aims to also create opportunities for: TAFE students, local Landcare groups and residents to be involved in annual monitoring while also creating more awareness of the significance of hollows.

If you are interested in volunteering in this program, please email: environmentalvolunteers@yarraranges.vic.gov.au