Road Management Plan

Overview

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Executive Summary

Yarra Ranges Shire Council (Council) is the custodian of an extensive range of community assets that it provides to facilitate delivery of its services to the community. This includes the roads for which it has responsibility for under the Road Management Act 2004.

The Council’s “Register of Public Roads” (Register) provides details of each of the roads the Council is the co-ordinating road authority for and which have been considered by the Council to be required for general public use. The Register is not an “incorporated document” in this Road Management Plan.

This Road Management Plan has been developed to assist Council in the management of Council’s public municipal road system, taking into consideration the important links provided by the State road network.

The Road Management Plan is a Council document that is used to assist the Council with the inspection, maintenance and repair of its public road network. In preparing and updating the Road Management Plan, Council has considered the needs of the community and the economic, social and environmental issues affecting the Council and the road users alike.

The Road Management Plan has determined the "levels of service" that meet the community's "reasonable" expectations of "day to day" maintenance and ongoing asset performance.

The Road Management Plan is a dynamic document and is subject to continuous improvement and review. Any queries or comments in relation to this Road Management Plan should be directed to:

Director Environment and Engineering Yarra Ranges Shire Council
Civic Centre
PO Box 105, Lilydale VIC 3140

 

General

Introduction

The introduction of the Road Management Act 2004 (referred to hereafter as the ‘RMA’) was intended to provide a more efficient and safer road network in Victoria.

In response to the introduction of the RMA and the Code of Practice for Road Management Plans in September 2004, Council first adopted a Road Management Plan (referred to hereafter as the ‘RMP’) in 2004.

The RMP was subsequently amended in 2009 and again in 2014.

The RMP has now been amended for a fourth time following a formal review.

In developing the policy decisions and relevant standards detailed in this RMP, Council has had regard to the six fundamental Best Value principles specified under Section 208B of the Local Government Act 1989:

  • Offer the best quality and value for money;
  • Be responsive to community needs;
  • Be accessible to those who need them;
  • Show continuous improvement;
  • Be subject to regular community consultation; and
  • Be regularly reported to the community.

This RMP has been developed with consideration to other Council documents including:

  • Council Plan including Vision 2036
  • Strategic Resources Plan
  • Corporate Asset Management Policy and Plans
  • Register of Public Roads

 

Council and Community Plans

Vision 2036 is the vision of the Yarra Ranges community, it is a statement about the kind of community and environment the community wishes to have in the future. In identifying its vision the community recognised a range of stakeholders, of which Council is one, who supports them in achieving their vision.

The Council Plan articulates the visions and values for Council and details the actions and activities Council will undertake.

The RMP is informed by the Yarra Ranges Council Vision 2036 and the Council Plan, and will link to the Asset Management Plans, to enable Council to manage its roads and other assets in a way which is consistent with the Council Vision.

The following diagram indicates the way in which these and other relevant documents interact.

road management plan diagram.JPG

 

Key Stakeholders

The key stakeholder groups, who are both users of the road network and/or are affected by it, include:

  • the community in general (for recreation, sport, leisure & business);
  • residents & businesses adjoining the road network;
  • pedestrians (including the very young, those with disabilities, and the elderly with restricted mobility);
  • users of a range of miscellaneous smaller, lightweight vehicles such as bicycles, mobility scooters, wheel chairs, prams, etc;
  • ·vehicle users such as trucks, buses, commercial vehicles, cars and motor cycles;
  • tourists & visitors to the area;
  • emergency services (Police, Fire, Ambulance, and SES);
  • utilities as defined in section 3(1) of the RMA;
  • State & Federal Government that periodically provide support funding to assist with management of the network; and
  • Council as the co-ordinating and responsible road authority.


Meaning of Terms

Terms used in this RMP have the same meaning as the specific definitions included in the RMA. For the purposes of this RMP the following additional terms are defined as:

Meaning of Terms

Term

Definition

Boundary Roads

Refers to roads that form the boundary between adjoining municipalities. Residents along these roads may pay rates to the Council but have their road maintained by the adjoining municipality.

Road or Road- Related Asset

Road infrastructure or road-related infrastructure, for example roadway pavement or roadway drainage.

Defect Type

The type of defect of a road or road-related asset, for example potholes in a road surface or a joint displacement in a concrete pathway.

Intervention Level

The level at which a defect is identified and recorded for intervention in accordance with nominated response times.

Hierarchy

A framework for segmenting an asset base into appropriate classifications. The asset hierarchy can be based on asset function, asset type or a combination of the two.

Kerb and Channel

Is considered to be road infrastructure and forms part of the roadway for the purposes of this RMP.

Level of Service

Is the defined service level against which performance may be measured and relates to quality, quantity, reliability, responsiveness and cost.

Maintenance

All actions necessary for retaining an asset in the state or condition determined in accordance with the RMA, but excluding rehabilitation or renewal.

Emergency

An emergency is defined as an event or situation that may pose an immediate risk to health, life, property and/or the environment.

Temporary Measures

Is a temporary measure that addresses the defect in a road or road-related asset that may include warning signs, barricades and/or temporary repair.

Performance Monitoring

Continuous or periodic quantitive assessments of the actual performance compared with specific objectives, targets or standards.

Response Times

The time to implement temporary measures and permanent measures.

Routine Maintenance

Day to day maintenance activities to keep the asset operating and which form part of the annual operational budget.

VicRoads

The Roads Corporation established under Part II of the Transport Act 1983 as continued under the Transport Integration Act 2010.

 

Purpose of the RMP

The RMA was developed to provide a more efficient and safer Victorian road network, and is based on the following key principles:

  • Clear allocation of road asset ownership and management;
  • Established processes and accountabilities for policy decisions and performance standards;
  • Provision of operational powers to achieve targets and performance standards; and
  • Clarification of civil liability laws for the management of roads.

The RMP is prepared in accordance with Part 4 Division 5 of the RMA and the Code of Practice for Road Management Plans September 2004.

The RMP has been developed to establish a management system for the local road functions that are the responsibility of Council. The management system is based on a policy decision having regard to the broad range of activities of Council. The policy and operational objectives recognises factors or constraints which are financial, economic, political, social or environmental.

This RMP sets out details of:

  • The management system to be implemented by Council in the discharge of its duty to inspect, maintain and repair roadways, pathways, road infrastructure (including kerb and channel) and road-related infrastructure under the control of the Council;
  • The standards and policies in accordance with which Council performs its road management functions.

This RMP also reflects the purposes and objectives of Council as specified under Sections 3A and 3C of the Local Government Act, 1989 and as mentioned above the Council Plan and Vision 2036.                        

The RMP contains information on the following:

  • a classification system for its road and pathway assets;
  • inspection standards that document the nature and frequency of different types of inspections (ie. proactive and reactive) (Condition surveys are also completed on the sealed road network for the purpose of providing information to assist in the effective ‘whole of life’ asset management.);
  • maintenance standards that document intervention levels, maintenance response required and maintenance response timeframes; and

management system for inspection, maintenance and repair of the roadways, pathways, road infrastructure (including kerb and channel) and road-related infrastructure under the control of the Council.

Roads and Pathways subject to the RMP

Register of Public Roads

Pursuant to Section 36 of the Act, the Council is the coordinating road authority for “municipal  roads”.

The term “municipal roads” is defined in the RMA to mean any road which is not a State road but is otherwise a road that Council has the care and management of pursuant to s. 205 of the Local Government Act 1989, a road declared by VicRoads under the RMA to be a municipal road, and roads which are part of a Crown land reserve where the Council is the Committee of Management.

Council will also be the responsible road authority for parts of arterial roads and some ancillary areas.

The Register lists all roads within the municipality and indicates their respective road hierarchy category and responsible authority. The road hierarchy categories are only used to differentiate service levels and maintenance standards.

The provisions of this RMP apply to:

  • those municipal roads listed in the Register that are generally required for public use;
  • pathways on those municipal roads referred to above;
  • the road infrastruture and road-related infrastructure that have been constructed by or transferred to Council;
  • those parts of arterial roads for which council is the responsible authority.

The RMP does not apply to:

  • roads for which another Authority is the co-ordinating road authority, eg VicRoads – other than for those parts of a municipal road for which the Council is the responsible road authority;
  • private roads;
  • unconstructed assets such as foot trodden tracks;
  • laneways and pathways on private land, or
  • ·vehicle entrances (crossovers) from the roadway to private property.

 

Any responsibility for road management functions between Council and another road authority pursuant to Schedule 1 of the RMA are listed in the Register.

Road Hierarchy

The Council has applied municipal road classifications for public roads where Council is the responsible road authority. These municipal road classifications specify each road by road use function, and reflect the perceived risk associated with the vehicle usage of each road type. These classifications are used to differentiate service levels, response times and maintenance standards for a particular type of road.

The general classifications used in the Road Register and RMP are:

General Classifications

Classification

Description

Responsible Authority

 State Arterial Roads *

 

 Road classification for major routes used by commercial vehicles and large traffic volumes. These roads are the responsibility of VicRoads and include state highways, tourist roads and main roads.

 
VicRoads

 Collector Roads*

Road classification for links between arterial and local roads that have a higher traffic usage and speed rating and serve many properties or adjacent local roads. Collector Roads

include both sealed and unsealed road surfaces.

 

Council

Local Roads*

Road classification for access to private property. These roads have low traffic usage and speed ratings and generally do not perform a through road or alternative route

function within the road system. Local Roads include both sealed and unsealed road surfaces.

 

Council

 Non Maintained Roads*

Road classification for roads not maintained by Council and includes roads maintained by other responsible authorities such as Department of Environment Land Water and Planning.

Also included in this classification are roads providing private access to a single or limited number of properties. A private access may exist along a road reserve from a public road before reaching a property access.

This classification additionally relates to driveway/shared access/road way created as part of an Owners Corporation subdivision.

 

 

 

Other

Pathway Hierarchy

The Council has a duty to inspect, maintain and repair such pathways (known generally as footpaths) that are on the public roads listed on the Register.

The Council has applied municipal pathway classifications for the pathways. These classifications specify each pathway by public use function, which reflects the perceived risk associated with the pedestrian and other usage of each pathway type. These classifications are used to differentiate service levels and maintenance standards.

These pathway classifications are:

Pathway Hierarchy

Classification

Description

High Use

Defined as pathways of very high pedestrian usage within the public road reserve eg. Major shopping precincts

General Use

Defined as pathways of general pedestrian usage within the public road reserve eg. local roads

Shared Use

Defined as pathways signed as shared usage within the public road reserve

eg. cycle/pedestrian pathways

Unsealed

Defined as formed crushed rock/gravel pathways within the public road

reserve. Generally the standard of construction is minimal and reactive maintenance only is carried out.

Codes of Practice & Agreements

The RMA includes provision for the making of Codes of Practice to provide practical guidance for road authorities and works and infrastructure managers such as Council in the performance of their functions and duties under the RMA.

The following Codes, relevant at the date of adoption of this RMP, will be complied with by Council in so far as required under this RMP:

  • Code of Practice for Operational Responsibility for Public Roads
  • Code of Practice for Road Management Plans
  • Code of Practice for Management of Infrastructure in Road Reserves
  • Code of Practice for Worksite Safety – Traffic Management

Any “Agreements” made between Council and any other party pursuant to any of the above Codes can be found in Council’s Agreement Register but do not form part of this RMP.

Boundary roads covered by an agreement are included in the road listing with a coordinating road authority identified, and in some instances a responsible road authority but do not form part of this RMP.

Level of Service

The Council has determined a level of service relevant to each category of road, pathway, road infrastructure and road-related infrastructure mentioned in this RMP. The level of service is specified in Appendix C. Appendix C details the type of defects that may be encountered within each asset type, the defect intervention level of each defect, the performance standard, and response time for this action.

Policies, Strategies and Procedures

In developing the level of service set out in this RMP, Council has given due regard to the Strategic Objectives as set out in the Council Plan and Vision 2036 and other relevant Council policies, strategies and procedures.

The standards specified under this RMP will, except in circumstances set out in section 3.5 of this RMP, maintain the level of service that is considered reasonable for the Council’s road network. The standards of inspection, maintenance and repair have been adopted after careful consideration of the economic, social and environmental constraints affecting Council. The Council has considered that these standards are reasonable for roads, pathways, road infrastructure and road-related infrastructure of the categories referred to in this RMP.

Inspections

The conduct of regular inspections of the road network is essential in maintaining public safety and optimum maintenance of the road, pathway, road infrastructure and road-related infrastructure.

The Council has developed inspection programs to ensure that road, pathway, road infrastructure and road-related infrastructure is maintained and repaired in accordance with the standards set out in this RMP. Details of the types of inspections are set out in Appendix A whilst the inspection program is set out in Appendix B.

This RMP acknowledges that changes to the Council’s road network will occur on a regular basis through construction of unmade roads, upgrading of maintenance standards, creation of new roads through subdivisions, etc and will need to be incorporated into inspection programs to ensure serving of these areas is in accordance with this RMP.

Level of Service Review

The level of service will be reviewed in conjunction with any review of this RMP. This review of the level of service may include consultation with a range of stakeholders, including the community in general.

Standards of Maintenance

The standards of maintenance applicable to the roads, pathways, road infrastructure and road- related infrastructure subject to this RMP are detailed in Appendix C of this RMP:

Council considers that the standards of maintenance detailed in the RMP are reasonable in the context of the Council’s overall strategic plans, Vision 2036 and economic constraints.

Exceptional Circumstances

The Council will make every effort to meet its commitments under its RMP.

However, there may be situations or circumstances that affect Council’s business activities to the extent that it cannot deliver on the service levels referred to in this RMP. These situations or circumstances, either man-made or naturally occurring, include but are not limited to natural disasters, such as fires, floods, and/or storms, or a prolonged labour or resource shortage, due to a need to commit or redeploy Council staff, contractors, and/or equipment elsewhere.

In such an event, the Chief Executive Officer will, following recommendation from Director Environment & Engineering or Municipal Emergency Response Officer (MERO), suspend part or all of this RMP in relation to response times and level of service. The relevant Officer will nominate when the suspension is to come into effect. The suspension will continue until revoked by the Chief Executive Officer.

Emergency Response

Upon being made aware of an “emergency” defect or hazard, Council will inspect the specified defect within 24 hours. For a defect to be classified as an emergency, it must pose an immediate risk to health, life, property and/or the environment. Various defects may be reported as “emergency” and the intervention levels differs dependent on the type of “emergency” defect reported.

An initial inspection is undertaken with the intent of assessing the reported emergency defect and to determine that the appropriate intervention level has been exceeded. A response may involve temporary measures until permanent repairs are undertaken and may require more than one operation. These temporary measures will be followed up with repairs to the hazardous asset that are deemed to be necessary.

After Hours Response

The intervention levels, performance standards and response times for various defects which Council are made aware of outside of Council’s standard business hours are assessed in accordance with Council’s After Hours Guidelines.

Financial Resources

Budget Provisions

The commitments and obligations specified in this RMP are determined by the financial and staff resources available to deliver those commitments and obligations as set out in the Council Plan.

The adopted Yarra Ranges Council Budget Report details the financial resources allocated for the construction, upgrading, renewal, rehabilitation, inspection, maintenance and repair of roadways, pathways, road infrastructure and road-related infrastructure..

The overall service delivery priorities of the Council determine the financial resources allocated for works on roads, pathways, road infrastructure and road-related infrastructure. These financial resources are determined as part of Council’s Annual Budget. Delivery of the service levels as contained in this RMP are dependant upon allocation of appropriate resources as part of the Annual Budget.

The financial resources allocated for works on roads, pathways, road infrastructure and road-related infrastructure have regard to the overall service delivery priorities of the Council and the outcomes of the Annual Budget Review.

 

Management System

Establishing Works Priorities

The Council will establish works priorities in accordance with its Management System taking into account its duty to inspect, maintain and repair public roads for which it is responsible.

Proactive and Reactive Service

The Council’s Service Request system has been established to receive and deal with service requests, complaints and other information from users and the community, including information regarding emergency situations occurring outside normal business hours and those circumstances that might develop into a Notice of Incident pursuant to section 115 of the RMA.

Reactive inspection information, resulting from service requests, and defect information from the regular proactive inspections are stored and utilised in relevant corporate computer systems. Appendix D is a flow chart showing the current Management System in relation to proactive and reactive inspections.

This current Management System provides for the regular monitoring and review of users’ and community service requests, complaints and information regarding the nature and standard of responses.

Maintenance Management System

Identification of Defects

Identification by:

  • inspection
  • ·notification by the public
  • ·notification by other authority

Risk Assessment

Council has assessed defect against intervention levels and considered likelihood and consequence of defect.

Intervention Level Reached

Council has determined the matters which are to be treated as defects requiring:

  • warning by signing
  • implement temporary measures
  • repair

Type of Intervention Action

Council has determined the type of intervention action to be taken in relation to each maintenance activity.

Target Time for Intervention Action

Council has determined the appropriate response times for each activity.

Safety at Council Work Sites

The Council’s construction and maintenance work on roads, pathways, road infrastructure and road- related infrastructure will be undertaken by Council and/or its contractors in accordance with the relevant occupational, health and safety legislation, and the Code of Practice for Worksite Safety – Traffic Management.

Quality Systems

The Council is committed to a quality approach in delivering the services set out in this RMP through the quality management systems of contractors engaged and Council’s team commitment to a systematic approach to the delivery of services. As a consequence best value and continuous improvement is achieved on an ongoing basis validated by regular surveillance and programmed audits of contractors, works units and subcontractors.

Information to Service Providers, or Works and Infrastructure Manager

If in the course of meeting its obligations under this RMP, Council becomes aware that the condition of any non-road infrastructure has resulted in a breach of Council’s relevant intervention level, it will convey appropriate information to the relevant service provider or works and infrastructure manager.

Service Authorities & Providers with assets within the road reserve include:

  • Water & Sewerage Authorities – Sewer pits, trenches and pipes, water supply valves & underground lines
  • Gas & Electricity Authorities – Pits, Trenches, Poles and overhead electric cables
  • Rail Authority – Rail tracks, crossings and signage used by both pedestrians and vehicles
  • Telecommunication companies – Poles, overhead cables, pits and trenches
  • VicRoads – State road pavement, surfaces, kerb and channels
  • Melbourne Water – Bridges, drains and aqueducts
  • Department of Environment Land Water and Planning – roads and bridges.

Repairs of non-road infrastructure is the responsibility of the works and or infrastructure managers responsible for the non-road infrastructure.

Records of Inspections and Maintenance Works

Records of all inspections and maintenance works undertaken on behalf of Council on the road network shall be retained to satisfy the requirements of the RMA and this RMP. In particular, defects that have reached the Intervention Levels shall be identified and prioritised, with regard to available resources, before rectification/repair works are completed.

Performance Management and Review

Performance Monitoring

Performance monitoring is undertaken on a programmed basis generally as follows:

  • Regular Management meetings between the Executive Officer Infrastructure Maintenance and the Infrastructure Maintenance Unit to monitor all operational matters including handling of correspondence, customer requests, H&S matters etc.
  • Regular meetings of the Infrastructure Services Department to consider regular reports.

This performance management regime is based on those inspection frequencies, intervention levels, and standards of maintenance that are crucial to ensuring that Council meets its obligations under the RMA.

An annual performance and compliance report will be prepared jointly by the Risk Managment Unit and Infrastructure Maintenance Unit for review by senior management and the Audit & Risk Committee.

Audits

A program of auditing, using internal or external auditors, is regularly conducted for the purposes of ensuring that all the management systems in place are delivering the levels of service adopted by the Council for its road network assets.

In the event that a non-compliance is identified the matter is brought to the Audit and Risk Management’s committees attention which then oversight the completion of the recommendation to resolve the non-compliance.

RMP Review

A formal review of this RMP will be completed, in accordance with the RMA, and the Road Management (General) Regulations 2016.

Amendment of Road Management Plan

Any amendment to the RMP is subject to the consultation and approval processes as detailed in the RMA and the Road Management (General) Regulations 2016.

Supporting Documents

The following un-incorporated documents, whilst complimenting the RMP do not form part of this RMP. Any un-incorporated document may change from time to time to reflect changes in Council policy, legislative changes, and operational changes or as a result of audit findings without the need to change the RMP. Supporting documents may be made available for inspection, upon request.

Technical References

  • Risk Management Standard, AS/NZS ISO 31000:2009
  • Compliance Program Standard, AS 3806: 1998
  • MAV Asset Management Improvement STEP Program – Road Asset Management Plan Framework 2003.
  • International Infrastructure Management Manual (IIMM) 2011, IPWEA

Council Documents & Procedures

Other relevant Council Documents & Procedures include:

  • Council Plan including Vision 2036
  • Council After-Hours Guidelines
  • Public Road Register
  • Boundary Road Agreements
  • Demarcation Agreements (Service Authorities)
  • Corporate Asset Management Policy
  • Environmental Code of Practice for Works on the Shire Controlled Land
  • Health and Safety Policy and Procedures
  • Municipal Strategic Statement
  • Yarra Ranges Planning Scheme
  • 10-year Long Term Financial Plan
  • 10-year Capital Expenditure Program
  • Streets and Roads Local Law 2005 (No.1 of 2005)

Availability of RMP and Associated Documents

This RMP and associated documents are available at the following locations and may be viewed, by the public, during Community Link opening hours:

 

Location

Address

Contact

Lilydale Community Link

Yarra Ranges Civic Centre 15 Anderson Street,

Lilydale, 3140

1300 368 333

Healesville Community Link

110 River Street

Healesville, 3777

(03) 5965-3501

Monbulk Community Link

21 Main Street

Monbulk, 3793

(03) 9756-7677

Upwey Community Link

40 Main Street

Upwey, 3158

(03) 9752-6054

Yarra Junction Community Link

2442-2444 Warburton Highway,

Yarra Junction, 3797

(03) 5967-2875

APPENDIX A - ASSET INSPECTION DETAILS

 

Inspection Type

 

Purpose

Inspection Performed by & Reporting Requirements

 

 

Reactive Inspection

  • Inspections undertaken following notification to Council of defects and safety issues
  • Council Officer or contractor with knowledge of road maintenance techniques who may then call in a higher level of expertise if necessary.
  • A record of the inspection is to be logged by the inspector on Council’s service request system.

 

 

Proactive Inspection

  • Inspections to determine if the road complies with the levels of service in terms of being within tolerable levels of defects (as defined in the Appendix C)
  • Inspections are recorded for all roads regardless of the identification of a defect or not.
  • Council Officer or contractor with knowledge of road maintenance techniques;
  • A record of the inspection is to be logged by the inspector on Council’s corporate asset system.

 

 

 

 

Bridge Inspection

  • Level 1 Inspection: Carried out in conjunction with a Routine or Reactive inspection to check the general serviceability of the structure, particularly the safety of road users, and to identify any emerging problems.
  • Level 2 Inspection: Rates the condition of a structure as a basis for assessing the effectiveness of past maintenance treatments, identifying current maintenance needs, modelling and forecasting future changes in condition.
  • Level 3 Inspection: Assesses the structural condition, performance and capacity of a structure, identifies and quantifies the current and projected deterioration of the structure and recommends appropriate management options.
  • Council Officer or contractor with extensive knowledge of construction and maintenance of bridges and major culverts and with relevant training.
  • Council Officer or contractors accredited by VicRoads to Level 2.
  • Council Officer or contractors accredited by VicRoads to Level 3.

 

APPENDIX B - INSPECTION REQUIREMENTS

INSPECTION FREQUENCY

ACTIVITY

SEALED

UNSEALED

COLLECTOR ROAD

LOCAL ROAD

COLLECTOR ROAD

LOCAL ROAD

Roadway Pavement, Shoulder & Kerb and Channel

6 months – Proactive

1 year – Proactive

 

 

Due to the inherent and unstable nature of unsealed roads, there is no proactive inspection program for these classes of road. Unsealed road performance is maintained in accordance with Council’s unsealed road grading program.

Delineation & Line marking

6 months – Proactive

1 year – Proactive

Guard fence Maintenance

6 months – Proactive

1 year – Proactive

Traffic Control Devices & Signs

6 months – Proactive

1 year – Proactive

 

 

Pathways

High Use – Proactive - 1 year General Use – Proactive - 3 years Shared Use – Proactive - 3 years

Unsealed – Reactive

 

Road Bridges and Major Culverts

Level 1 – Proactive - 1 year Level 2 – Proactive - 1 year Level 3 – As Required

 

Roadway Drainage Infrastructure

Proactive – 4,000 sealed roadway pits inspected per annum Reactive – All pits as required

Roadway Retaining Walls

Reactive

APPENDIX C - LEVEL OF SERVICE - INTERVENTION LEVELS, PERFORMANCE STANDARD & RESPONSE TIMES

DEFECT TYPE

INTERVENTION LEVEL

PERFORMANCE STANDARD

RESPONSE TIME

Roadway Pavement, Shoulder & Kerb and Channel

 

 

Repairs to Roadway Bituminous Surfacing

Any distressed surfacing area greater than 10sq.m. (distressed surfacing includes delamination, flushing, ravelling, stripping, loss of aggregate, bleeding or excessive crocodile cracking)

Permeability: The resultant surfacing should provide a uniform water resistant layer to protect the pavement layers from surface infiltration of moisture.

15 Months (subject to funding)

 

 

 

Concrete Roadway Pavement Repairs

Greater than 2 cracks per slab where crack width > 5mm or faulting > 10mm.

The concrete pavement is to comply with the adjacent pavement as a minimum standard and will meet Council materials specifications. Similarly surfacing is to comply with the adjacent roadway and Council specifications.

Permeability: The surfacing should provide a uniform water resistant layer to protect the pavement from surface infiltration of moisture.

15 Months (subject to funding)

 

 

 

Roadway Crack Sealing

Any crack > 2.0m in length with average crack width ≥ 3mm.

Appropriate treatments shall be used to allow suitable infill rather than surface “bridging” of cracks. The resultant surface should provide a water resistant layer to protect the pavement layers from surface infiltration of water.

15 Months (subject to funding)

 

 

 

 

Grading Unsealed Roadways

Approved unsealed road grading program to be delivered to schedule.

Lateral Drainage: Crossfall on straights is to be between 3% and 6% directly after grading.

Surface Defects: Defects such as channels, scouring, corrugations, rutting, shoving and soft spots are to be limited to less than 5% of the area directly after grading.

Drainage: The existing invert level in table drains is to be maintained below the surface at the edge of formation directly after grading.

As per approved unsealed road grading program, generally graded 3 to 6 times per year dependant on road category.

Pothole Repair - Unsealed Roads

 

Any pothole with depth ≥ 150mm and ≥ 500mm or equivalent lateral dimension.

 

 

Ride Quality: The patch shall be consistent with prevailing surrounding road conditions.

Integrity: All repairs shall comprise materials that are generally compatible with the existing pavement.

Better quality materials may be used.

 

Local - 40 Business Days

Collector - 20 Business Days

 

Pothole Repair - Sealed Roads

 

Any pothole with depth ≥ 100mm and ≥ 300mm or equivalent lateral dimension.

 

 

Ride Quality: The patch shall be consistent with prevailing surrounding road conditions.

Permeability: All repairs shall be provided with water resistant surfaces.

Integrity: All repairs shall comprise materials that are generally compatible with the existing pavement. Better quality materials may be used.

 

Local - 40 Business Days

Collector - 20 Business Days

 

Sealed Road Edge Break Repairs

 

 

Longitudinal Fretting > 1000mm, >100mm    lateral fretting and >100mm in depth.

 

 

Ride Quality: The road edge break repair shall be consistent with prevailing surrounding road conditions.

Permeability: All repairs shall be provided with water resistant surfaces.

Integrity: All repairs shall comprise materials that are generally compatible with the existing pavement. Better quality materials may be used.

 

Local - 40 Business Days

Collector - 20 Business Days

 

Sealed Road Pavement Repair

 

Any road pavement failure not covered by another defect type, including pothole repair, edge repair, and repairs to bituminous surfacing.

 

 

Ride Quality: The patch shall be consistent with prevailing surrounding road conditions.

Permeability: All repairs shall be provided with water resistant surfaces.

Integrity: All repairs shall comprise materials that are generally compatible with the existing pavement. Better quality materials may be used.

 

 15 Months (subject to funding)

 

Unsealed Shoulders Repairs

 

 

Edge of seal drop off > 100mm for100m

 

 The performance standards include:
Lateral Drainage: Crossfall on straights is to be between 3% and 6% directly after grading and the increase of crossfall from the standard 3% is to be minimised.

Surface Defects: The surface is to be tight, compact and free of defects in shape or soft spots.

Shape: Throughout the length the shape of the shoulder will be continuous with the sealed pavement and reflect the superelevation or crossfall of that pavement such that grass or silt build up will not hold up water. 

 Local - 40 Business Days Collector - 20 Business Days

 

 Local Scour Repair

 

 Any scour occurrence length > 5m and mean scour depth ≥ 200mm.

 

This activity covers the minor repair of scouring in the vicinity of drains and/or scouring adjacent to inlets or outlets to drainage structures draining the road area. The work includes action to reinstate the area affected and to prevent re-occurrence of the scour.

 

 15 Months (subject to funding)
Street Sweeping – Localised Areas on Road Pavement

 

When the accumulation of aggregate, dirt and other debris becomes ≥ 10sqm.

 

Loose unwanted material should be removed from the roadway surface so as to enhance skid resistance and to provide for pedestrian safety on the road.

Local - 40 Business Days

Collector - 20 Business Days

 

 Street Sweeping – Kerb and Channel

 

Areas of accumulation of aggregate, sand, dirt, leaf matter and other detritus material occurring on and adjacent to kerb, kerb and channel, and traffic management devices .

 

 Loose unwanted material should be removed from the roadway surface so as to enhance skid resistance and the effectiveness of linemarking and RRPMs, and to provide for pedestrian safety on the road.
No litter or debris within 1.6m of kerb or kerb and channel.

 

 As per approved street sweeping program, generally 8 to 12 times per year dependent on location category.

 

Kerb and Channel Repairs Step or misalignment in kerb and channel > 50mm.

 

 For defects > 50mm, kerb and channel shall be prioritised on a program.

 

 3 year program (subject to funding)

 

 Delineation & Line Marking
 Delineation & Line marking

 

 Linemarking and Pavement Marking:
  • >50% per segment missing or defective in relation to original installation and design standards.

Delineation:

30% of delineator installations per segment missing or defective in relation to original installation and design standards.

 

 Linemarking, Pavement Marking, and Delineation to be provided to specified standards.  15 Months (subject to funding)

 

 Guardfence Maintenance
 Guardfence Maintenance

 

Guardfence with a panel or component affected which may undermine integrity.

 

To maintain guardfence so that all sections and components will function as designed.

 

Local - 60 Business Days

Collector - 4 Business Days

 

 Traffic Control Devices & Signs
 Guide Signs and Traffic Instruction Signs If signs are tested through the use of a relectometer and do not meet the relevant Australian Standards.

 

Reflectometer reading in excess of Australian Standard and sign is legible in the direction of travel under daylight conditions. 20 Business Days
 Regulatory and Warning Traffic Signs

 

 If signs are tested through the use of a relectometer and do not meet the relevant Australian Standards.

 

Reflectometer reading in excess of Australian Standard and sign is legible in the direction of travel under daylight conditions.

 

5 Business Days

 

 Pathways
Pathway Repairs  

Step or misalignment in pathway

30mm, or longitudinal undulations > 50mm over a distance of 1000mm.

 

 

For defects > 30mm, temporary measures shall be undertaken on pathways (eg. asphalt wedges, grinding or crushed rock) and permanent pathways repairs shall be prioritised on a program.

For defects with longitudinal undulations >50mm over a distance of 1000mm, pathways repairs shall be prioritised on a program.

 

5 business days to undertake     temporary measures, and permanent repairs on a 3 year program (subject to funding)

 

Fence and Handrail Maintenance (excluding bridges)

 

Defect which encroaches into pedestrian or vehicular paths of travel.

 

Defect response will involve an initial undertaking of temporary measures followed by prioritisation on a works program.

 

24 hours to undertake temporary measures, 30 business days to repair (subject to availability of materials)

 

 Road Bridges and Major Culverts
 Bridge & Major Culvert Maintenance  Repairs identified as part of the approved Bridge and  Major Culvert scheduled inspection program.

 

 

The bridge or major culvert should be maintained to ensure that:

  • It meets reasonable performance standards for use by vehicular traffic, including bicycles where applicable.
  • It is maintained generally in accordance with approved standards and works programs
Inspections to be completed by a suitably qualified and experienced person.

 

 As per approved Bridge and Major Culvert works program.

 

 Road Drainage Infrastructure
Clear Open Drains

 

Drain cross sectional area reduced by > 50% or drainage diverted out of drain path.

 

Capacity of the open drain will be reinstated following removal of reported blockage.

 


6 Months
Roadway Drainage Pit Repair

 


Inspection reveals repair is required to repair or replace damaged pits, surrounds, grates, lids or lintels that undermines integrity.

 


Repairs maintain flow characteristics of pit. Repairs return pit to a state of reasonable performance.

 


Local - 40 Business Days

Collector -20 Business Days

 


Blocked Roadway Drainage Pipes & Pits Blockage of pipe or pit.

 


All road pits, road culverts, road kerb inlets, road side entries, road grates and road pipe culvert inlets shall be cleared to prevent blockage, or bypass to downstream inlets and subsequent surcharge and or flooding.

 


Roadway pits - Local - 10 Business Days, Collector - 5 Business Days

Roadway pipes - Local - 40 Business Days, Collector - 20 Business Days

 

Appendix D - Management system to inspect, maintain and repair

appendix D road management plan.JPG