Episode One: The Yarra Ranges Disability Sector

Show notes

In this episode, we talk to members of the disability sector in the Yarra Ranges – from the head of a community organisation to a carer, learn more about this vibrant and integral part of the Yarra Ranges community.

For more information about disability support services at Yarra Ranges Council, visit our website or sign up to our MetroAccess newsletter.

To contact us about this episode, email mail@yarraranges.vic.gov.au or visit the Yarra Ranges Council Facebook page.

To learn more about CNB Safe Safety Speakers, visit James' website. For more information on Tasty Az, visit their website or Facebook page. If you would like to join Shek's carers support group, send your details to mail@yarraranges.vic.gov.au.

Transcript

Host                   
You're listening to the Yarra Ranges Podcast. This podcast is recorded on Wurundjeri Country – we acknowledge their Elders past, present and emerging. The opinions expressed in this recording are those of the speakers and may not reflect or represent the views of Yarra Ranges Council. 
The Yarra Ranges is home to a vibrant and diverse community, with a strong disability sector. This sector includes people who live with disabilities and the people who advocate for them, including carers and community organization employees. I interviewed five individuals who are part of the disability sector in some way. In this episode you'll hear about their stories and the work they do in the sector, as well as useful information and resources to help you or somebody you care about. 

I recently spoke to Kate Johnson, founder of SJI Autism and Carer Support, about her unique experience as a carer, and as someone who runs a not-for-profit organisation in the Yarra Ranges disability sector.

Kate Johnson
So my name is Kate Johnson and I’m the founder and director of SJI Autism and Carer Support. We were established about seven and a half years ago, on my couch. My son was diagnosed at four years nine months. When my son was diagnosed we decided to start our own charity because there was lots of gaps in helping families navigate ASD. We were relying on professionals to tell us what to do and they weren't the best people to direct in terms of understanding ASD carer support, understanding my child's behaviour. It was just about ticking boxes. We felt very isolated, we felt very overwhelmed, and my child's behaviour and his needs escalated dramatically. One day we were sitting there watching something on TV and this autistic surfer came on and he was talking about all the support he had when he was a child, and I realised that we'd been sitting on waiting lists for six months for early intervention. Nothing had happened, we didn't know what we were doing. There had to be better ways of doing it. I sat down one day and just wrote a whole lot of gaps that I saw from a professional perspective and then a parent perspective and then worked with our little group of women in the lounge room to refine that and that's really how we started.

Host
That's amazing. Can you talk through some of the gaps in what was available back then?

Kate Johnson
So the gaps were really, in particular, equipping parents with information to support them to support behaviours, understanding behaviours in the first part. Our biggest goal was to educate parents, to equip them to do the best job as parents possible, as well as provide support for the family and also teachers and educators. So our goal was to equip educators to be more aware of ASD in the classroom and the positive strategies they could use, as well as equipping parents for home so then the barriers would be reduced to caring for that child and it would be more consistent and better quality care across the board. 
When you're driven by passion and you can see big needs…I've never been one to sit back on the side and go, ‘someone else will do that’. I've got a crazy personality that kind of thinks that I can try and it's a really hard journey. Running a charity is really hard. Last year we impacted over 2000 educators and parents just through education, let alone any of our other projects. Our blessing bag project, which we started earlier on, went to 1000 carers across Victoria. This year it's looked very different because of COVID, but our services have gone across Australia. People are accessing us from different states. So it's quite a ride but I’m very much driven by seeing the need and thinking with my team innovatively as to how we can go at that a different way. 

Host
If a parent was just joining up at SJI, what is the full range of the services available?

Kate Johnson
So currently we have ASD carer counselling and that's free. So we cover three initial sessions and then three extra sessions if people need it – so that's about six hundred dollars per carer worth of support. Lots of carers will write in asking for help navigating the NDIS, or trying to find a therapist, or problems navigating school, as well as ‘I’m just starting out, our child just got a diagnosis last week, I don't know where to go’. Carly, one of our amazing community engagement officers, is phenomenal. So she supports a lot of carers via email now and calls them as well. 
We have our carer giveaways: once a week we give away about 40 packs. They're worth about $40 each, full of different items. Last week it was ‘cosy night in’ and we did a blanket with hot chocolate, marshmallows – those kinds of things – to watch a movie. Their core principle is to bring joy and to provide some respite time for self because a lot of carers can't get any support at the moment. So it's creating systems where they feel empowered to look after themselves and like they've got a focus to do that. We also have our carer yoga online. We used to do that at our hub in Chirnside Park and we have about twenty carers each week. Twenty to thirty sign in and do one hour of yoga at night, per week. The impact of that, because it's all relaxation and breathing, has really helped carers to: a) schedule time for themselves, and b) to learn coping strategies. 
When it's really hard, we do educational webinars. So we have turned all of our face-to-face services. We used to do big workshops every month, everywhere, to help parents and educators. Instead, we're doing it online and that's meant a lot more people can access it, too, from across Regional Victoria and across the Yarra Ranges as well. So, yeah. So they're the things we're trying to do at the moment, as well as I guess keep our operations running.

Host
I've been thinking about carers during this time, as well, because it's such an emotionally intensive role isn't it?

Kate Johnson
Yeah, yes.

Host
And that, plus lockdown…so it's more intensified. So what's the kind of message that you want the wider community to know about what life is like for carers at the moment?

Kate Johnson
I think the big one is: less judgment, more compassion. I remember when Mr Molino released the [information] for Stage 3 Lockdown, that students with special needs could attend school – and there was a massive uproar on social media about ‘how do they get this and we don't’, and there was a real divide in the community. Our families fight every day for access to everything that other people don't even have to give a second thought for. I think that this what COVID brought out. 
There's been some really great things it's brought out in terms of community connection, but I think what we're lacking at the moment is a little bit of compassion and hope in some areas and there's a lot about ‘what about me’. We've seen that in the community or in the disability sector, in blaming people for not wearing a mask, for example. If you've got sensory needs or you've got an intellectual disability or your teenager or child on the autism spectrum cannot wear one for sensory reasons…I've got a friend who I do a podcast with, Fiona, and they were yelled at across the street because her son forgot his mask, because they were avoiding a meltdown, so they had to leave their house quickly. They stayed away from people but someone decided to give them the law and yell at them from across the street about being a terrible citizen. 
This is a wonderful time to put yourself in another person's shoes and instead of blaming, go ‘I wonder why that is? I wonder what I can do to help?’ If you're a friend of those who may be doing it tough, reach out. It doesn't have to be elaborate – it can be a text message telling them they're doing a good job, it can be a phone call. You might have a family who's doing it really, really tough in your community and there's ways that you can reach out to them and it's really, really hard but eventually this will end. 
What we've been saying in as many forums as possible is: protect your head. Do you have to listen to everything? No, you don't. Can you delete news apps off your phone? Yes, you can. And to listen to what you need to and then just get on with doing your day-to-day without having the circumstance of the world impacting your ability to cope every single day.

Host
Since our interview, it has been announced that SJI Autism and Carer Support has had to close due to insufficient funding. Our thoughts are with the SJI Autism and Carer Support team at this time.
 

I was able to interview James Wood, a member of the Disability Advisory Committee. The Disability Advisory Committee is a committee of people who are a part of the disability sector. The committee's role is to advise Council on projects and policies in order to help council improve accessibility, access and awareness. James also runs CNB Safe Safety Speakers, an organisation that employs speakers to run workplace talks about proper safety.
Thanks for joining us. So did you want to start off by explaining the history of your business?

James Wood
Look, it's an interesting one, Marilla. I never planned to do what I do. I had a workplace accident about thirty years ago. I’m a diesel mechanic by trade. One day I went to work – I had a simple job to do, something I'd done hundreds of times before. A truck had broken down on the on the worksite. Now, I'd fixed fan belts hundreds of times before, so I didn't really think about the job. I went out and changed the fan belt on the truck – that was easy, there was no real problem with the job – and then I had to take the truck back to a parking bay, which was just a short distance away. So I climbed up into the cabin. I happened to have a quick look at my watch and I noticed that the time was five to nine in the morning. 
‘Smoko’ or morning tea was at nine o'clock, so I thought, “oh great. If I can get back to the lunch room by nine o'clock, I can catch up with my workmates”. 
So I took off down the road. I was in my early twenties you know, ten-foot tall and bulletproof like we all are at that age. Put my foot down a little bit, in a bit of a hurry to get back to the lunch room. I was going a little bit too quick for the conditions and I lost control of the truck. Me and the truck ended up rolling down the side of a hill. They worked out I rolled the truck three times. I got thrown out of the cabin and I broke my back damaged my spinal cord, and I've been getting around in a wheelchair for the last thirty years.

Host
And so you created a business?

James Wood
Well, not really. I mucked around for a few years, just trying to get back on track. I had to start to learn to live all over again. So I found a new place to live, a new job, new everything. 
 But then one day, one of my former workmates, he'd made it up into a management position, and he rang me and he said, “Look, James.” He said, “We're having this safety day. Would you come out and tell people what happened to you?”
 And initially I said no. I said, “There's no way I’m going to sit in front of a group of people and talk about my accident.”
 He kept nagging me and one day we were sitting together and we're having a couple of drinks and a bit of a chat and he asked me a question. 
 He said, “Look, if someone had turned up at our workplace before you got hurt, is this the sort of thing that you would have listened to?” 
 And something just clicked. I thought yeah, you know what? I would have liked to have heard somebody else's story, not just coming from my manager or my boss or my safety people, but if I heard, you know, and saw what had happened to someone it would have had that little bit more of an impact on some of the choices that I used to make. So I agreed to go out and share my story at his workplace and it just went from there and I've been doing it now for over twenty years now, I think. The beauty of what I do is I can relate to the guys and the girls that I’m talking to and they can relate to me. 
Look, I've got a website, I’ve got all the social medias, but a lot of my work comes from word of mouth. There's not many people in my situation, you know, that have actually had an injury at work and can talk from first-hand experience. So I think I've got that little bit more credibility than a lot of, you know, people that that haven't had a workplace injury. 
Yes and it's a more impactful story because of that experience, yeah, and I think the other side of it too, Marilla, is I've got a team. There are actually seven of us that have all experienced some sort of workplace injury or fatality. We have one of our presenters is a mum who…her twenty-three year-old son got killed at work, so she goes out and shares the story of what it's like to get a phone call telling her that her twenty-three year-old son has been killed. So it's all personal experience. None of us are safety professionals but we do have that real, lived experience of safety.

Host
So how has COVID impacted your business?

James Wood
Oh, huge. It's pretty much shut us down. Our business relies on speaking to groups of people, you know, groups of employees. So, often we'll get invited out to a workplace or councils. I've done some work for the Yarra Ranges Council you know for their parks and their outdoors and parks and gardens guys and girls but because of COVID you just can't get that many people in the same room at the same time. It's just too risky at the moment, so yeah, we're on a temporary shutdown and hopefully when this is all over we'll uh we'll pick up again.

Host
So you are also part of the Disability Advisory Committee with Yarra ranges, is that correct?

James Wood
Yeah I joined the Disability Advisory Committee, or the DAC, two years ago now. This is my second year on the Committee and that was a bit of a personal thing for me. As I explained at the start, I've been getting around in a wheelchair for over thirty years, so I've had a lot of experiences where things could have been made a little bit easier for me, or for someone in my situation – just by, you know, slightly changing the gradient of a ramp or the access to a building (especially a public building). I thought to myself, there's got to be a way that I can have a little bit of input into some of these decisions.

Host
What kind of work does the DAC do, for someone who might not be familiar with the Committee? 

James Wood
From my understanding, most councils make decisions for their communities and for the people that live in the shire. Some of these decisions involve access or changes to public buildings, changes to public places. The Disability Advisory Committee has some input into some of these decisions. So they run some of these decisions past the DAC and the DAC members comprise of people with disabilities and people with an interest disability. And they can then have some input into some of the decisions that the council makes.

Host
That's fantastic.

James Wood
It is. It's really rewarding to be able to see that we're working towards a more inclusive and a better community for everybody.
 

Host
Julie-Ann Morman is the founder of Tasty Az, a food and catering company that is also a social enterprise. 

Jules Morman
Tasty Az is a not-for-profit social enterprise that adopts commercial strategies of business to be successful. In October 2013, we started Tasty Az in a church kitchen. We are competitive with every other catering provider in the Yarra Valley. What Tasty Az does is we deliver education, training, cooking and life skills, work placement and work experience opportunities and pathways to employment for young people who just happen to also live with a disability. Part of my dream is that no young person would ever be declined the opportunity to have work experience in this industry. Tasty Az is actually its abbreviation, we’re Tasty Az Community Connections and that's exactly what we do – we connect and we work within the community. I have two other directors and then we have some key personnel who work to support our team members – they are now holding roles of instructors – and then we have our supported employees. We have some NDIS participants who are learning to acquire the employability skills and then we have work experience students who are coming out of senior school and they're working towards becoming participants of the NDIS program as well. It's very unusual and people do struggle to understand how it works but it does work. 

Host
What is one of the things that you enjoy most about running Tasty Az?

Jules Morman
When the young people and the participants achieve their outcomes and they're so, so happy. They're so happy to bring joy to others and they're so happy to recognise that ‘I can do that. I did do that.’ Like today, they're doing roast beef in a slow cooker with Yorkshire Pudding and vegetables they've never made Yorkshire Puddings before, so now they're all sending me pictures of, ‘look at these babies! They're huge.’ 
 And it's just about doing things differently and allowing people, in the right environment, at their own time, with the right support – they can do anything. We're just here to help them do what they want to do.

Host
So how can potential participants get involved? Or if someone wants to join Tasty Az, how could they reach out to you?

Jules Morman
We take expressions of interest. We're doing that now for those who are moving through senior school and looking for opportunities next year. We have local area coordinators who share our brochure and get information that way. People can certainly send us a message through our Facebook page and we're currently developing at the moment our website.

Host
What is your opinion of the sector in the Yarra ranges and the support that's offered to people who have disabilities?

Jules Morman
I think we have fantastic programs, facilities and opportunities for young people who live with a disability within our local area. I would like to see people challenge themselves more to be able to provide more opportunity in the society that we live in. These days, where so many things can be adapted, why isn't employment more adaptable to our needs? Why aren't we making it more available and more adaptable and why, if people live with a disability, why do they have to necessarily be made to feel special or different? I did an interview recently and I was asked a particular question. The question was: in your group of people, your team, your participants, what sort of disabilities do they live with? I was absolutely dumbfounded and I’m like, well we don't actually look at the disability – when anybody comes to us, even if it's an expression of interest, that doesn't matter. 
 What matters is, “What does Jack want to do? How does he want to do it? Are we the right fit to help him do it?” 
 If so, let's do it. That's all we're interested in, that's all that matters.
 
 

Host
Megan works at Tasty Az as a catering assistant and assists with PR.
How long have you been working at Tasty Az?

Megan
I've been at Tasty Az, I would say, maybe we're coming up to about three and a half years now?

Host
And how do you feel it has benefited you?

Megan
Well, I think it's definitely helped my employability skills and my confidence as well – like, just talking to people. I think because I've, you know, had a lot of social anxiety meeting new people and when you're kind of out into the community and you're kind of, you know, doing that for a living and you're obligated to talk to these people, that's how you, I guess, you know, network, I guess you could call it. And you're talking to people a lot, so I think that's really helped me with my skills when it comes to socializing and just talking to people. Because sometimes you've got to talk to strangers in work placements all the time, so that's really helped a lot. 

Host
So what do you want to do? What kind of work do you want to be involved in?

Megan
For a very long time I was very set on childcare, but it wasn't very easy to get into the industry and I think I found that a bit difficult. Like, I would go for interviews and have trial days as well and I didn't get chosen and I think after a while I kind of gave up. And since being at Tasty Az, I've actually been wanting to do disability support, so now I’m studying to be a disability support worker. And now I really, really want to do that and I think that's definitely where I’m supposed to be and that's kind of my calling. Yeah, I just, I guess I’m just someone that has a lot of different interests and a lot of different dreams and ambitions, I guess.

Host
Tasty Az is currently running international cooking classes and has been sending out lots of hampers to local customers. Visit the Tasty Az Facebook page for more information.
 

I interviewed Shek Kho, who is a member of the Disability Advisory Committee and a carer for her son. Thank you so much for taking the time to chat with me. I know that you're involved with the Disability Advisory Committee – so what has working on the committee been like for you?

Shek Kho
I have to take you back to around a year ago when I was approached by Amanda. I’m always very interested in how can we as carers, especially carers, put our voice across to authority: the Council, maybe state government and the federal government. The reason why I say this is, often among our carers, we always say that ‘how I wish this could happen, how I wish that could happen’ and we always say it among ourselves. One day I was thinking to myself, why don't we put all these thoughts, all these wishes to someone who can actually be the right person to make those wishes come true? The wishes from the carers are very simple. Sometimes it can be that we just need someone to be there that we could talk to and listen to us. 
So Amanda approached me because we have this Carers Walk. She said to me, “Would you be interested to join the Disability Advisory Committee?” 
And I was thinking, “Okay, but exactly what do I do?” 
I always want to help to advocate. I think we are lacking this support for carers and I was thinking to myself, there are so much things that I could help to also put across and voice up on behalf of the carers.

Host
How long have you been a carer?

Shek Kho
Oh, my son was first diagnosed…oh, when he was about three or four years old. My mother actually picked that up and one day she said to me, “Your son seems, to me, quite different.” 
We were back in Malaysia, where I originally come from. My mother's example was that he doesn't look at us in the eyes. I started to look into it and when he went to school at the age of four, he climbed underneath the desk when the teacher called out his name. I started to pay a lot of attention about his behaviour at the age of six or seven. He got punished a lot in the school – the principal caned him on his leg. He came home with all the marks, at about seven years old. I bumped into a newspaper and a notice saying a seminar about learning difficulty, so I went to that – my first seminar in my life. The doctor has explained some of the features which I found quite similar to my son and I approached the doctor. 
The doctor said to me, “Do you know about autism?” She said, “Autism is a form of learning difficulties.”
Then she sent me to a centre, where I brought my son for assessment. At that time, nearly like twenty years ago already, Malaysia also didn’t have a clue about autism. So even though we did nearly half an hour of assessment, we have to send the assessment to the US to get that diagnosis. So, about three months later, the diagnosis came back. Yes, the word autism was in the report. That's how I discovered and I started my journey of caring from there. It was a lot, a lot. You asked me this question, you brought back a lot of the memories. I’m glad that we are in Australia now and with NDIS, the new scheme, it really has taken the burden off from a lot of us. I wouldn't say a hundred per cent, because there's still room for improvement in regards to that scheme, yeah.

Host
I hope you are finding some space and joy and relaxation here and there during this stressful time.

Shek Kho
I do actually. My New Year resolution for 2020 was to at least have some me time for myself. Ten minutes of coffee at home which is quite simple for a lot of people, but to carers…to find that ten minutes, that time without disturbance is very hard. I use that as looking after my mental health and with this lockdown I can do it daily now. This is something we like to organise among our carers, too – just a coffee, a chat for half an hour or one hour. It's just so precious to us. 

Host
Do you have a network of other carers that you are in contact with regularly?

Shek Kho
Yes, yes. When I came back to Australia – my son, by the way, he was born in Dandenong Hospital. Yes, and when he was two we went back. And then when he was fourteen, because there were so many issues with education in the school – being physical, punishing him and then that wasn't very good for him mentally and in his health and I was very stressed, he was very stressed – and so we decided to come back to Australia when he was fourteen. I didn't know the Australian Government could support people like us. 
Then I heard from a friend, a carer friend, from Bulleen High School that my son went to, told me that, “You would like to ring this department.”
I said, “What for?”
“Get them to [assign] you to have a case manager, to help you manage.”
So we are migrants, and we didn't know. I started to attend courses, seminars and I started to make friends. I was interested to make friends with those migrants, especially from Southeast Asian countries, because I found that, the reason I feel, that they might have similar experiences to me: don't know where to seek for help, don't know whether they are eligible for help, and I share something that I have attended from a seminar or a talk or news from the Council. We call ourselves a carer support group.

Host
Can people join?

Shek Kho
Oh, yes. Yes, yes. I welcome anyone. We have got about thirteen countries.

Host
That's very impressive.

Shek Kho
Yes, we are very relaxed in that forum, so anyone and everyone can ask anything. We are there to support each other. I think a lot of carers, we like to share, to have someone to listen. Someone may not be a psychologist or a counsellor to listen to us. You don't have to say anything, you don't have to actually understand caring roles – just be there. We just want to talk, and with the Council’s support of the disability [sector], I think there is a lot of things we can still do to support the carers. We want also to build the awareness. I think reaching out to the carers in the Yarra Ranges will be a good start.


Host
I got a chance to speak to Amanda May, who is an advocate in the disability sector, working at Yarra Ranges Council. Amanda works to improve access and inclusion for people living with disabilities in the Yarra Ranges, working with community organisations and representatives.
So what is your role at Council?

Amanda May
So, my role at Council is a Disability Inclusion Officer, which is a Community Development role, linking people with disabilities and their family into the life of their local community.

Host
How is Council improving access and inclusion for people with disabilities, to make their lives easier?

Amanda May
So, Council has an equity access and inclusion strategy and that recognises that inclusion of people with disability in all aspects of community life is a human right. It also brings many social, cultural and economic benefits to the wider community.
Across Council, we work to address barriers that people with disability encounter when accessing our buildings, playgrounds, parks and recreation facilities. We've got a process, that we progressively improve accessibility for Council-owned facilities and infrastructure, including footpaths and parking.

Host
What projects are Council currently working on to support people with disabilities? Is there anything in the pipeline?

Amanda May
Okay, so a key part of my role is to develop and strengthen advocacy and leadership capacity for people with a disability. So, currently I’m working on several projects with Women with Disabilities Victoria, that are focused on the prevention of violence against women with disability, and I've been connecting those [people] with lived experience into these projects. Another example is that every year we celebrate International Day of People with Disability by holding a community event focused on challenging stereotypes and highlighting the skills and contributions people with disability bring to their community. This year's event will focus on the importance of inclusive recreation in Yarra Ranges.

Host
I spoke to Kate Johnson at SJI Autism and Carer Support about support that's offered to carers. What support does Council offer for carers?

Amanda May
So an example of some of the support we provide is the Pathways for Carers Walks. They're based at Healesville and Mt Evelyn and they provide an opportunity for carers to connect with others, to enhance their knowledge and improve strategies to deal with some of the daily issues they face in their caring role. So unfortunately, while we can't meet face-to-face, the Mt Evelyn Community House and Healesville Living and Learning Centre provide support to carers to continue to meet online and to connect with services such as Villa Maria and Carer Gateway. Through these services, carers can access free counselling and participate in online wellbeing activities. Throughout Council, we have other support, too. So, for example, Council's Early Years Community Support team and Youth Development team offer families inclusive community engagement activities, including their school holiday programs. If you want more information you can check out the Facebook pages for Pathways for Carers, Yarra Ranges Families and Yarra Ranges Youth.

Host
What community organisations does Council work with to assist people living with disabilities, and their family and carers?

Amanda May
So in my role at Council, I've developed strong partnerships with disability services and community organisations and networks, to ensure the voice of people with disability and their carers is heard in all relevant forums. Community houses and libraries in the Yarra Ranges provide much needed local connection and activities, and Council’s leisure centres work with Council to broaden their range of accessible programs and increase the participation of people with disability and their family members.

Host
You and I have spoken a bit about your newsletter, before – that's the Yarra Ranges Disability Inclusion newsletter – what info does the newsletter provide? Does it offer any opportunities for people to learn about services and support available?

Amanda May
So, this newsletter is monthly and it includes upcoming online events for carers and people with disabilities. So each month subscribers are encouraged to have a say on upcoming projects and developments. Local services and support are also highlighted and for more information you can also check out Council's website, and that's got information on Council’s disability services and support.

Host
In this episode I've discussed the Disability Advisory Committee, or DAC. I spoke to James and Shek about it. So, the DAC assists Council in improving access and inclusion for people living with disabilities. What are some projects or policies that the DAC has influenced?

Amanda May
Okay, so it's important that Council staff consult with people with disabilities in a way that their voice is heard and valued. The Council consults on key projects and strategies with the DAC, then they provide feedback to support Council's decision-making. So, on the DAC we've got people with disability, carers and disability service providers. The Equity Access and Inclusion Strategy, or the Disability Action Plan, guides Council actions to increase access and inclusion for people with disability. The DAC monitors the implementation of this strategy and it also is consulted on other strategies and plans, for example: Council's Integrated Transport Strategy, our Recreation and Open Space Strategy and Healthy and Active Ageing Plan. 
Important initiatives to improve access have been implemented due to the strong relationship between Council and the DAC. For example, consultation with the DAC led to modifications of street and park furniture to improve access for people with disability to our parks and open spaces.

 

Host
We hope that you have enjoyed this episode. If you are a part of the disability community, as a carer or someone who lives with a disability, sign up to our MetroAccess newsletter to receive up-to-date information and resources. You can sign up on the disability support page on our website or via the link in our show notes. If you are interested in knowing more about CNB Safe Safety Speakers or Tasty Az, take a look at the links in our show description. If you want to join Shek's carers group, please email us with your contact information and we will pass it on to her. If you have any thoughts or information that you would like to share please email mail@yarraranges.vic.gov.au. We would love to hear from you.